Welcome to CD3 DFL

cd3_smallWe’re the volunteer organization of the DFL (Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party) covering Minnesota’s 3rd Congressional District. The map of the area is to the left. Our district covers:

Brooklyn Park
Coon Rapids
Eden Prairie
Long Lake
Maple Plain
Maple Grove
Medicine Lake
Minnetonka Beach
Spring Park
St. Bonifacius
Tonka Bay
Victoria, and

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How To Vote In Minnesota

How to vote in Minnesota! Everything you need to know from registering and voter ID laws to absentee voting and sample ballots!
Check your registration status: https://mnvotes.sos.state.mn.us/Voter…
Register online: https://mnvotes.sos.state.mn.us/Voter…
Register by mail: http://www.sos.state.mn.us/media/1587…
Request an absentee/mail ballot online:  https://mnvotes.sos.state.mn.us/ABReg…
Request an absentee/mail ballot by mail: http://www.sos.state.mn.us/media/1909…
Find the address to mail your ballot: http://www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-…
Track your absentee/mail ballot: https://mnvotes.sos.state.mn.us/Absen…
Find your early voting location and hours: http://www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-…
Find your polling place: http://pollfinder.sos.state.mn.us/
Look at a sample ballot: http://www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-…

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‘Stranger Things’ Actor Recalls Story of Donald Trump’s Sexist Behavior at Work

The following article by Jacob Bryant was posted on the Variety website October 25, 2016:

Donald Trump has been criticized throughout his presidential campaign for the way he treats women, from his “blood” comment to Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly to the leaked Billy Bush tapes.

Now, Matthew Modine, one of the stars of Netflix’s “Stranger Things,” alleges that the GOP candidate would engage in sexually degrading behavior at his own office in New York.

In an interview with Variety’s VP and executive editor Steven Gaydos during the Carmel International Film Festival, Modine — who says that he knows the Trump family and is “very good friends” with the billionaire’s brother, Robert — told a story about one former intern’s experience working for Trump. (more…)

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Hispanic woman claims co-workers used Trump images to harass

In the Trump brings out the worst in people category, the following article by Ryan J. Foley of the Associated Press was posted October 25, 2016:

A Hispanic woman says her white co-workers at an Iowa claims office used images of Donald Trump to racially harass her for months after they learned she was angered by his description of Mexican immigrants as rapists, according to a civil rights lawsuit she filed against her company.

Alexandra Avila This undated photo provided by attorney Paige Fiedler shows Alexandra Avila, of Columbus Junction, Iowa. Avila has filed a lawsuit that alleges her co-workers at the Coralville, Iowa office of Sedgwick Claims Management Services repeatedly used the image of Donald Trump to harass her after she objected to Trump’s comments about Mexican immigrants. (Alexandra Avila/Paige Fiedler via AP) APImages.com More photos »

Alexandra Avila’s co-workers at Sedgwick Claims Management Services — where they administered benefits for Wal-Mart employees — began calling her an “illegal immigrant” even though she’s a natural-born U.S. citizen, according to the lawsuit filed Monday in Iowa district court. The suit claims her former co-workers placed a picture of an angry-looking Trump as Avila’s computer’s screensaver, signed her up to volunteer for his campaign and sent her racist memes, including one that read: “How’s Mr. Donald Trump going to deport all these illegals? Juan by Juan.”

The Republican presidential candidate’s promise to build a border wall to keep out Mexican immigrants has for months contributed to racial tensions nationwide. “Build a wall” chants have been used by high school students to taunt Latino opponents at sporting events in multiple states, including Iowa, Wisconsin and Indiana. At Kent State University, Latinos marching in the Homecoming parade this month said they were taunted with the same chant.

Avila, a 32-year-old mother of one who worked at Sedgwick for three years, claims she faced similar heckling at her white-collar workplace in Coralville, Iowa, from the beginning of Trump’s campaign in June 2015 until after she was fired five months later.

“It’s been a weird political season where one candidate is taking public stances on things that, if the same words were said in the workplace, might constitute violations of our civil rights laws,” said Avila’s attorney, Paige Fiedler. “His candidacy has emboldened some people to feel like that doesn’t violate social norms anymore.” (more…)

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Sierra Club Endorses Terri Bonoff in Minnesota’s Third Congressional District

sierra-club-pac-endorseSierra Club, the nation’s largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization, endorsed Terri Bonoff, who’s running to represent Minnesota’s Third Congressional District. Her opponent, Erik Paulsen, has a dismal record on environmental policy, and does not acknowledge that human beings are contributing to climate change.

“As a State Senator, Terri Bonoff has long been an advocate for Minnesota’s natural resources and consummate proponent for clean energy. We know she will champion these and other issues of great importance to our members across the nation as a Congresswoman.” said Leili Fatehi, Political Committee Chair, North Star Chapter of the Sierra Club.

“I am proud and honored to receive this endorsement,” said Terri Bonoff. “I have been an ardent supporter for the use and promotion of clean energy and for protecting our environment. Our future depends on how we choose to tackle climate change today. This is an issue where I significantly differ with my opponent, who has been unwilling to address climate change, despite the very real threat it presents to our world.”   (more…)

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How False Equivalence Ruins Trump-Clinton News Coverage

The following article by John Kerr from Media Matters was posted on the National Memo website October 22, 2016:

News outlets covering the presidential election have made the mistake of treating Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump as two equally flawed candidates. That false equivalence has made it harder for voters to understand the categorical differences between their options on November 8.

In typical elections, news outlets often treat both major presidential candidates as relatively similar — comparing their flaws, scrutinizing their respective scandals, and framing the election as a choice between two comparable options.

That approach hasn’t been appropriate this election cycle. Clinton is not a flawless candidate — her campaign has been dogged by conspiracies surrounding the Clinton Foundation and her use of a private email server as secretary of state. But she is a relatively conventional one — abiding by both constitutional and political norms.

Trump, on the other hand, represents a dramatic break from mainstream American politics. He threatens the First Amendment, demonizes minority groups, cozies up to white supremacists, championed the birther movement, invites Russian interference in the election, promises to arrest his political opponent, lies constantly, lacks the most basic interest in and knowledge of public policy, says he may not accept the results of the election because he believes it to be “rigged” — the list goes on and on.

These are not equally flawed candidates. But a number of news outlets have treated them as such, devoting similar amounts of attention and ink to Clinton and Trump’s respective controversies.

The New York Times has been criticized for its disproportionate focus on Clinton’s email server and the Clinton Foundation, so much that the paper’s public editor penned a defense of the paper’s coverage:

The problem with false balance doctrine is that it masquerades as rational thinking. What the critics really want is for journalists to apply their own moral and ideological judgments to the candidates.


If Trump is unequivocally more flawed than his opponent, that should be plenty evident to the voting public come November. But it should be evident from the kinds of facts that bold and dogged reporting unearths, not from journalists being encouraged to impose their own values to tip the scale.

That approach, treating both candidates’ scandals equally and hoping voters come to the correct conclusion, is a big part of the reason that voters view Trump and Clinton as being similarly untrustworthy, and view their missteps as similarly concerning. Audiences internalize the way the media covers each candidate in relation to the other.

Treating two wildly different candidates as if they’re equally flawed is not “fairness” — it’s a journalistic failure. And news outlets that have failed to explain the categorical differences between the controversies dogging Trump and Clinton’s presidential campaigns have done a real disservice to voters who want to understand what’s at stake in November.

You can read the post here.

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