#CostsOfRepeal: Congressman Paulsen Would End $49 Million Local Investment in Minnesota Community Health Centers

Congressman  Erik Paulsen’s plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act would end new significant local investments in community health centers, including $49 million  in Minnesota instead sending us back to an old, broken system that gave insurance companies free rein and left millions of Americans to get their only care in emergency rooms, driving up costs for everyone.

In addition to the jobs-creating investments in Minnesota’s local health care providers, Community Health Centers have served 181,000  Minnesotans in 2012. By investing in local health facilities, the Affordable Care Act has helped to created more than 35,000 jobs in the past four years but Congressman Paulsen would end this $49 million investment in local health centers in Minnesota, and instead take us back to a system where millions of Americans relied on emergency rooms for primary care and drove up costs across the board.

“The mounting price tag for Congressman  Paulsen’s reckless obsession with repealing the Affordable Care Act is devastating, especially since he would end $49 million  in job-creating investments in Minnesota’s economy,” said Emily Bittner of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. “Not only that, these Community Health Centers helped keep 181,000 patients in Minnesota out of emergency rooms for their primary care, and reduced costs across the board. But Congressman  Paulsen’s repeal plan would take us back to that old, broken system that drove hardworking Americans into bankruptcy and gave insurance companies free rein over our care.”

BACKGROUND:

HHS: Community Health Centers Expanded to Create 35,000 New Jobs and Add 4 Million New Patients Since 2009. “Today, approximately 1,200 health centers operate more than 9,000 service delivery sites that provide care to over 21 million patients in every State, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Pacific Basin.  Since the beginning of 2009, health centers have added 4 million patients and more than 35,000 new full-time positions.” [HHS.gov, 11/07/13]