NEW REPORT: Congressman Paulsen’s Non-Existent 2014 Agenda Hurts Middle Class Families

According to a New York Times report this morning, Congressman Erik Paulsen’s “‘do nothing’ Congress is preparing to do even less.”

The paper revealed that Congressman Paulsen’s Republican leaders have an even more pathetic agenda in store for 2014 than in 2013, when they hurt middle class families by obsessively focusing on repealing the Affordable Care Act and refusing to pass measures that would help create jobs, increase wages and strengthen the middle class.

According to the report: “Representative Eric Cantor of Virginia, the House majority leader, is quietly playing down expectations for any major legislative achievements in the final year of the 113th Congress, which passed fewer laws in its first year — 65— than any single session on record. The calendar, drawn up to maximize campaign time ahead of midterm elections in November, is bare bones, with the House in session just 97 days before Election Day, the last on Oct. 2, and 112 days in all.”

“Congressman Paulsen spent last year standing in the way of reasonable solutions, protecting insurance companies and tax breaks for billionaires and big oil – and today’s report reveals that Congressman Paulsen plans more of the same this year, while middle class families continue to struggle,” said Emily Bittner of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. “Minnesota’s middle class families are getting squeezed more and more every day, with earnings stagnating and millions of Americans still looking for work, but Congressman Paulsen’s non-existent agenda will only continue to show that they would rather side with their big contributors and special interests than work for the middle class.”

BACKGROUND:

New York Times: “‘Do Nothing’ Congress is Preparing to Do Even Less.”  “Representative Eric Cantor of Virginia, the House majority leader, is quietly playing down expectations for any major legislative achievements in the final year of the 113th Congress, which passed fewer laws in its first year — 65 — than any single session on record. The calendar, drawn up to maximize campaign time ahead of midterm elections in November, is bare bones, with the House in session just 97 days before Election Day, the last on Oct. 2, and 112 days in all. […]Expectations for the session are so low that lawmakers say early action on White House priorities like raising the minimum wage, restoring unemployment benefits that expired and overhauling immigration laws are likely to go nowhere.” [New York Times, 1/05/14]