Insist on justice for women

Way back in 1979, a woman named Lilly was working as an overnight manager for Goodyear.  It was a great job for a woman at that time and Lilly did well — she was named “Top Performer” in 1996 by Goodyear.

But a while after that Lilly received an anonymous note saying she was being paid 40 percent less than her male colleagues.  It was devastating for her to consider the amounts lost to her wages, retirement and savings over 19 years at Goodyear.

So Lilly sued the company and won $360,000 in compensation.  But Goodyear appealed and the case went to the Supreme Court. Read More

Medicare for all will work better

To the Editor:

I recently attended a presentation organized by the Plymouth Indivisible group, by Dr. Timothy Magee, representing the nonprofit “Healthcare for all Minnesota” in which he made an excellent argument for universal and single payer health care.

We learned that the United States has health services that are about average compared to European countries and Canada, and in many ways not as good, but we pay significantly more for that care.  A large portion of that extra expense is ultimately used to run the health care insurance system, and another large portion is spent by health care provides doing their part of the insurance paperwork. Read More

Tax you twice, ain’t it nice?

To the editor:

Under current law, you don’t have to pay federal income tax on money that you paid for state and local taxes — money that buys things like police, streets, schools.

Our representative to the United States Congress, Erik Paulsen, thinks that’s wrong. He voted this month for a tax law change that will make you pay federal income tax on some of the money you already spent on state and local taxes.

He wants to tax you twice.  Won’t that be nice? Read More

Need to quit playing games

The Graham-Cassidy bill being considered on the Senate floor is a destructive and poorly thought out bill that, like its predecessors, looks to strip health care from millions.

It’s unethical and immoral. What’s worse, it is again being ram-rodded to a quick vote to save face with Republican constituents and gain a political “win.” The health of millions seems to be less important and only exist to these people as a bulletpoint from their corporate backers.

A working health care solution is a human issue that should not be defined by or designed for political gain. Political positioning should not determine accessibility and cost. Read More

What is Paulsen’s definition of a town hall?

Sept. 6 marked six full years since the last town hall held by Congressman Erik Paulsen. He has stated several times that he’s held over 100 town halls, but that’s a distortion of the truth.

Through public statements by the congressman along with a conversation I personally had with his office, it can be determined that he considers the following to be “town halls”: unannounced pop-up appearances in supermarkets, corporate appearances, carefully controlled and unannounced conference calls, scripted videos and even emailed newsletters. Read More

Rep. Paulsen needs to hold town hall meetings

To the Editor:

In an April MPR interview, Rep. Eric Paulsen of Minnesota’s Congressional District 3 stated the following regarding his unwillingness to hold a town hall: “Certainly I think there are some that would prefer to have campaign-style events, with shouting, and that kind of thing. And that’s not just very good, it’s not Minnesotan,” he said. “Civility is probably the most important thing that we need right now.”

Does Rep. Paulsen realize it isn’t very civil to make assumptions about his constituents? His assumptions about shouting at town halls certainly aren’t from his own personal experiences holding them. Read More

There is no death tax

To the Editor:

Congressional District 3 Representative Erik Paulsen’s office recently distributed flyers touting how he is working to repeal the “death tax” on our behalf.

Just to be clear, the term “death tax” is used to scare people into thinking they are taxed for dying. This is ridiculous. What he is referring to is the federal estate tax. The estate tax only impacts people with an estate worth over $5.49 million.

If you are in that category, he’s working for you. If not, he’s working for someone else. Hint: The 1 percent.

Gail Porter, Brooklyn Park
Brooklyn Park Sun-Post, September 13, 2017

Paulsen must know that true town halls hold a distinct purpose

Sept. 6 marks six full years since the last town hall held by Rep. Erik Paulsen¹. He has stated several times that he’s held over 100 town halls², but that’s a distortion of the truth.

Through public statements by the congressman³ along with a conversation I personally had with his office, it can be determined that he considers the following to be “Town Halls”: unannounced pop-up appearances in supermarkets, corporate appearances, carefully controlled and unannounced conference calls, scripted videos, and even emailed newsletters. Read More

Paulsen needs to step up his game

Congressman Erik Paulsen, as you should be well aware, the many infammatory pronouncements by Donald Trump during the last two years are causing a signifcant increase in hate crimes. The fact that he is now president and commander-in-chief legitimizes his disgusting ideologies in the warped and depraved minds of the collective “alt-right.” Trump is providing them tacit, if not overt, approval to cause terror, violence and murder on our family, friends and neighbors. The cause and effect is clear and unequivocal. The fact that the GOP has not aggressively moved to counter this emerging abomination is inexcusable and unforgivable.

The GOP’s addiction to party over morality and country is disgusting beyond words. It is treasonous. Trump and the GOP have released the alt-right genie from its hellhole and our fellow citizens and country will suffer the violent consequences for decades to come. Congressman Paulsen, you are culpable in this offense. Read More

State Fair appearance proves we can have accountability, civility

U.S. Rep. Erik Paulsen saw what civil discourse looks like during his Star Tribune Stage interview at the State Fair on Friday with editorial writer Patricia Lopez. The newspaper’s Saturday coverage of the event spoke of Paulsen’s request for “civility, discourse, restraint,” which he was given in spades on Friday. The congressman has mentioned on multiple occasions that he believes a town hall would be a spectacle, and Friday’s event proved him wrong. Lopez’s questioning was direct and on point, and thanks to her, for the first time in years, a crowd of unscreened constituents was given the opportunity to hold Paulsen accountable. He was asked directly about his history of public events, about Russia, even about impeachment, and no one chose to talk over him or shout at him before or during his responses. It was the closest thing to a town hall we’ve gotten in six years, and it was respectful and engaging. His “spectacle” excuse no longer stands; if he doesn’t hold a town hall, it will only be to his detriment.

Kayli Schaaf, Coon Rapids
Minneapolis Star Tribune, August 29, 2017